Home » , , , , » Cool Photo Sizes images

Cool Photo Sizes images

Check out these photo sizes images:


New Orleans - French Quarter: Jackson Square and St. Louis Cathedral
photo sizes
Image by wallyg
Jackson Square, a rectangular plot of land, roughly the size of a city-block, marks the site of the original settlement of New Orleans by the French Mississippi Company. Known at the time as Place d'Armes, it was designed in 1721 by landscape architect, Louis H. Pilié. It originally served as military parade grounds, and later as a market place and site for executions. Today it is a well manicured park and the spiritual center of the French Quarter.

From 1762-1803, after New Orleans was ceded to Spain in the Treaty of Paris and served as the Capital of the French Province of Louisiana, it bore the spanish translation of its original name, Plaza de Armas. After being returned to French control in 1801, the city was part of the land sold to the United States in the Louisiana purchase in 1803. It was in the Place d'Armes that the American flag was first raised over the newly purchased territory.

After the Battle of New Orleans, the final major battle of the War of 1812, the plaza was renamed in honor of General Andrew Jackson, an American military commander in the battle who would go on to serve as the seventh President of the United States, from 1829-1837. In 1856 the Baroness Celestin Pontalba paid for the square's beautification. Under her auspices, the Pelanne brothers designed the wrought-iron fence surrounding the park and on February 8, 1856, sculptor Clark Mills' equestrian statue of Jackson was dedicated in the center of the park. The statue, one of three identical casts (the others are in Washington D.C. and Nashville, TN), depicts General Jackson reviewing his troops at the Battle and was the first to ever depict a hero astride a rearing horse. After occupying the city after the Civil War's Battle of New Orleans in 1862, Union General Benjamin "Beast" Butler engraved "The Union Must and Shall Be Preserved" on the plinth.

Surrounding the park is a pedestrian plaza. Diverse artists rent space and hang their works on the fence, and jazz musicians, tarot card readers, and clowns entertain throngs of tourists. When originally laid out, the plaza overlooked the Mississippi River, but the view was blocked in the 19th century by larger levees. Under the administration of Mayor Moon Landrieu, a scenic boardwalk, known as Moon Walk, was built along the river. Flanking the uptown and downtown sides of the Square, are the Pontalba Buildings, matching red-brick block long 4-story buildings erected in the 1840's. The ground floors house shops and restaurants; the upper floors are apartments that are the oldest continuously rented in America.

On the Place John Paul II, the promenaded section of Chartres Street stretching the last length of the park, sit three historic buildings financed by Don Andrès Alomonester y Rojas, the Baroness Pontalba's father. The center of the three is St. Louis Cathedral. To its left is the Cabildo, built in 1795. It served as the capitol for the Spanish colonial government, then later as City Hall, and home of the State Supreme Court, and today houses the Louisiana State Museum. It was here that the finalization of the Louisiana Purchase was signed. To the cathedral's right is the Presbytère, built between 1794 and 1813. It originally housed the city's Roman Catholic priests and authorities, and then served as a courthouse until 1911. Today it is part of the Louisiana State Museum, housing a Mardi Gras Exhibit.

The Saint Louis Cathedral is the oldest, continuously operating cathedral in the United States and the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans. Three Roman Catholic churches have sat on this site since 1718. The cornerstone of the present structure, designed by Gilberto Guillemard, was laid in 1789, elevated to cathedral status in 1794 and completed in 1795. In 1819, Henry S. Boneval Latrobe added the clock and bell tower. Between 1845 and 1851, J.N.B. DePouilly remodeled and enlarged the church. In 1964, the cathedral was designated as a minor basilica by Pope Paul VI. Pope John Paul II visited the basilica, on the occassion of his second pastoral visit in the United States on September 12, 1987.

Jackson Square National Register #66000375 (1966)
Vieux Carré Historic District National Register #66000377 (1966)


New Orleans - French Quarter: Jackson Square, Cabildo, St. Louis Cathedral and Presbytère
photo sizes
Image by wallyg
Jackson Square, a rectangular plot of land, roughly the size of a city-block, marks the site of the original settlement of New Orleans by the French Mississippi Company. Known at the time as Place d'Armes, it was designed in 1721 by landscape architect, Louis H. Pilié. It originally served as military parade grounds, and later as a market place and site for executions. Today it is a well manicured park and the spiritual center of the French Quarter.

From 1762-1803, after New Orleans was ceded to Spain in the Treaty of Paris and served as the Capital of the French Province of Louisiana, it bore the spanish translation of its original name, Plaza de Armas. After being returned to French control in 1801, the city was part of the land sold to the United States in the Louisiana purchase in 1803. It was in the Place d'Armes that the American flag was first raised over the newly purchased territory.

After the Battle of New Orleans, the final major battle of the War of 1812, the plaza was renamed in honor of General Andrew Jackson, an American military commander in the battle who would go on to serve as the seventh President of the United States, from 1829-1837. In 1856 the Baroness Celestin Pontalba paid for the square's beautification. Under her auspices, the Pelanne brothers designed the wrought-iron fence surrounding the park and on February 8, 1856, sculptor Clark Mills' equestrian statue of Jackson was dedicated in the center of the park. The statue, one of three identical casts (the others are in Washington D.C. and Nashville, TN), depicts General Jackson reviewing his troops at the Battle and was the first to ever depict a hero astride a rearing horse. After occupying the city after the Civil War's Battle of New Orleans in 1862, Union General Benjamin "Beast" Butler engraved "The Union Must and Shall Be Preserved" on the plinth.

Surrounding the park is a pedestrian plaza. Diverse artists rent space and hang their works on the fence, and jazz musicians, tarot card readers, and clowns entertain throngs of tourists. When originally laid out, the plaza overlooked the Mississippi River, but the view was blocked in the 19th century by larger levees. Under the administration of Mayor Moon Landrieu, a scenic boardwalk, known as Moon Walk, was built along the river. Flanking the uptown and downtown sides of the Square, are the Pontalba Buildings, matching red-brick block long 4-story buildings erected in the 1840's. The ground floors house shops and restaurants; the upper floors are apartments that are the oldest continuously rented in America.

On the Place John Paul II, the promenaded section of Chartres Street stretching the last length of the park, sit three historic buildings financed by Don Andrès Alomonester y Rojas, the Baroness Pontalba's father. The center of the three is St. Louis Cathedral. To its left is the Cabildo, built in 1795. It served as the capitol for the Spanish colonial government, then later as City Hall, and home of the State Supreme Court, and today houses the Louisiana State Museum. It was here that the finalization of the Louisiana Purchase was signed. To the cathedral's right is the Presbytère, built between 1794 and 1813. It originally housed the city's Roman Catholic priests and authorities, and then served as a courthouse until 1911. Today it is part of the Louisiana State Museum, housing a Mardi Gras Exhibit.

The Saint Louis Cathedral is the oldest, continuously operating cathedral in the United States and the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans. Three Roman Catholic churches have sat on this site since 1718. The cornerstone of the present structure, designed by Gilberto Guillemard, was laid in 1789, elevated to cathedral status in 1794 and completed in 1795. In 1819, Henry S. Boneval Latrobe added the clock and bell tower. Between 1845 and 1851, J.N.B. DePouilly remodeled and enlarged the church. In 1964, the cathedral was designated as a minor basilica by Pope Paul VI. Pope John Paul II visited the basilica, on the occassion of his second pastoral visit in the United States on September 12, 1987.

Jackson Square National Register #66000375 (1966)
Vieux Carré Historic District National Register #66000377 (1966)


Schloss Charlottenburg
photo sizes
Image by Wolfgang Staudt
Get here a large view!

Das Schloss Charlottenburg befindet sich im Ortsteil Charlottenburg des Bezirks Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf von Berlin. Es gehört zur Stiftung Preußische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin-Brandenburg.

Geschichte

Das Schloss wird zunächst als Lietzenburg zwischen 1695 und 1699 von dem Architekten Johann Arnold Nering im Auftrag von Sophie Charlotte, der Gattin des Kurfürsten Friedrich III., im Stil des italienischen Barocks errichtet. Nach der Krönung Friedrichs zum König Friedrich I. in Preußen und Sophie Charlottes zur Königin 1701 wird das ursprünglich als Sommerhaus konzipierte Schloss vom Architekten Eosander von Göthe zu einer prachtvollen Anlage erweitert. Nach dem Tod seiner Gemahlin 1705 nannte der König das Schloss und die angrenzende Siedlung ihr zu Ehren Charlottenburg. Von 1709 bis 1712 wurde ein weiterer Ausbau durchgeführt, bei dem der Ehrenhof mit der markanten Schlosskuppel und die (westliche) Orangerie entstanden.

Für Schloss Charlottenburg war ursprünglich auch das Bernsteinzimmer bestimmt – eine komplette Wandvertäfelung aus Bernstein, die später auch als „das achte Weltwunder“ bezeichnet werden sollte. Entworfen wurde es von dem Architekten und Bildhauer Andreas Schlüter. Die Anfertigung wurde zunächst dem dänischen Bernsteindreher Gottfried Wolffram anvertraut, der sich wohl seit 1701 in Diensten Friedrich I. befand. 1706 wurde die Ausführung den Danzigern Ernst Schacht und Gottfried Turau übertragen, da Wolfframs Preise als zu hoch empfunden wurden. Für welchen Raum dieser Schmuck ausersehen war, war lange Zeit unbekannt – heute gilt die Rote Damastkammer als gesichert. 1712 wurde die Arbeit noch erwähnt, ist jedoch für Charlottenburg nicht mehr vollendet worden. Teile der Bernsteinvertäfelung wurden im Berliner Stadtschloss in ein an den Weißen Saal angrenzendes Kabinett eingebaut. Friedrich Wilhelm I. machte das Bernsteinzimmer dann dem russischen Zaren Peter dem Großen im Jahr 1716 zum Geschenk.

Nach dem Tode Friedrichs I. im Jahr 1713 führte das Schloss Charlottenburg unter dessen Nachfolger Friedrich Wilhelm I. ein Schattendasein. Seinem ökonomischen Sinn widerstand es jedoch, das Schloss gänzlich zu vernachlässigen. So wurden dem Bau die notwendigen Unterhaltungsmaßnahmen nicht versagt; auch mussten die Räume in der kalten Jahreszeit geheizt werden, damit die „paneelarbeit und meubles nicht verstocken“. Zudem wusste Friedrich Wilhelm I. das Schloss für offizielle und repräsentative Zwecke durchaus zu nutzen. Hier wurde 1725 mit Georg I. von England der „Charlottenburger Vertrag“ abgeschlossen, der dem brandenburgischen Hause die langumkämpften Erbansprüche auf Jülich-Kleve sicherte. Ebenso herrschte im Schloss tagelang festliches Leben, als August der Starke im Sommer 1728 dem König einen Gegenbesuch abstattete.

Sofort nach dem Tode Friedrich Wilhelms im Jahr 1740 machte der neue König Friedrich II. (später Der Große bzw. Alter Fritz genannt) Charlottenburg zu seiner Residenz. Er fühlte sich zu diesem Ort, an dem seine schöngeistige und hoch gebildete Großmutter Sophie Charlotte gewirkt hatte, sehr hingezogen. So ließ er zunächst Räume in Obergeschoss des Mittelbaus (Altes Schoss) für sich herrichten. Die von Friedrich Christian Glume ausgeführten – und im Zweiten Weltkrieg gänzlich verloren gegangenen – Schnitzereien der Vertäfelungen waren noch so unbeholfen, dass sie lange Zeit für Arbeiten aus dem 19. Jahrhundert gehalten wurden (Friedrich Wilhelm IV. und seine Gemahlin Elisabeth bewohnten später diese Räume). Gleichzeitig hatte Friedrich den Auftrag gegeben, das Schloss durch Knobelsdorff für seine Bedürfnisse im Stil des Rokoko erweitern zu lassen, wobei – anstelle der geplanten, aber unter seinem Vater nicht mehr verwirklichten östlichen Orangerie – der Neue Flügel (seit der Nachkriegszeit Knobelsdorff-Flügel genannt) entstand. Danach erlosch Friedrichs Interesse an Charlottenburg jedoch zugunsten des 1747 fertiggestellten Schlosses Sanssouci bei Potsdam.

Seine heutige Form erhielt das Schloss unter Friedrich Wilhelm II. mit dem den westlichen Abschluss bildenden Schlosstheater (das jedoch bereits am Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts zum Möbeldepot umfunktioniert wurde) und der Kleinen Orangerie von Carl Gotthard Langhans. Das Schlosstheater spielte in der Geschichte des deutschen Theaterwesens eine wichtige Rolle, da Friedrich Wilhelm II. es zu einer Pflegestätte der unter Friedrich dem Großen vernachlässigten deutschen Literatur machte. In dem seit 1795 auch für Bürgerliche freigegebenen Theater gingen Stücke von Goethe und Lessing über die Bühne. Im Neuen Flügel ließ sich Friedrich Wilhelm II. auf der Südseite des ersten Stockwerks eine Winterwohnung sowie im Erdgeschoss der zum Park gelegenen Nordseite eine Sommerwohnung im Stile des Frühklassizismus völlig neu einrichten.

Friedrich Wilhelm III. ließ im Innern des Schlosses keine größeren Veränderungen vornehmen. Lediglich nach der Rückkehr aus dem Exil kam es zur völligen Neugestaltung des Schlafzimmers der Königin Luise nach Entwürfen Karl Friedrich Schinkels. Unter Friedrich Wilhelm IV. wurden unter anderem die Räume des ersten Stockwerks des Alten Schlosses (Mittelbau) im gravitätischen Stil des späten Klassizismus sowie Neo-Rokoko für ihn und seine Gemahlin Elisabeth als Wohnung neu eingerichtet. Nach dem Tode Friedrich Wilhelms IV. (1861) nutzte Königin Elisabeth das Schloss als Witwensitz. König/Kaiser Wilhelm I. zeigte wenig Interesse an Charlottenburg.

Im sogenannten „Dreikaiserjahr“ 1888 diente das Schloss König Friedrich III., dem todkranken „99-Tage-Kaiser“ als Residenz.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


 
Support : Copyright © 2015. Photos Gallery - All Rights Reserved