Home » , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , » Copper mining section between Ducktown and Copperhill], Tennessee. Fumes from smelting copper for sulfuric acid have destroyed all vegetation and eroded the land (LOC)

Copper mining section between Ducktown and Copperhill], Tennessee. Fumes from smelting copper for sulfuric acid have destroyed all vegetation and eroded the land (LOC)

Check out these image post images:


Copper mining section between Ducktown and Copperhill], Tennessee. Fumes from smelting copper for sulfuric acid have destroyed all vegetation and eroded the land (LOC)
image post
Image by The Library of Congress
Wolcott, Marion Post,, 1910-1990,, photographer.

Copper mining section between Ducktown and Copperhill], Tennessee. Fumes from smelting copper for sulfuric acid have destroyed all vegetation and eroded the land

1939 Sept.

1 slide : color.

Notes:
Title from FSA or OWI agency caption.
Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944.

Subjects:
Sulphuric acid industry
Copper mining
Rivers
Erosion
United States--Tennessee--Ducktown
United States--Tennessee--Copperhill

Format: Slides--Color

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Part Of: Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Collection 11671-6 (DLC) 93845501

General information about the FSA/OWI Color Photographs is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.fsac

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/fsac.1a34328

Call Number: LC-USF35-129


Victorian Mortality
image post
Image by brizzle born and bred
image above: Nineteenth-century photograph of dead child with flowers.

Photographing dead children was a common practice years ago during Late Victorian & Early Edwardian times. (1860 - 1910) Infant & child deaths were very common.

Because of high mortality rates in Victorian England, she said, death and mourning became a way of life for survivors.

"These days, nearly 80 percent of deaths happen in hospitals, not in the home, so we are removed from this process," "In London, in 1830, the average life span for middle to upper-class males was 44 years, 25 for tradesman and 22 for laborers. Fifty-seven of every 100 children in working class families were dead by five years of age."

Death was a common domestic fact of life for Victorians, so they developed elaborate rituals to deal with it. The deathbed became a focal point for families who were in the process of losing a loved one.

In some cases, especially with children, there might well have been no other photographs for the family to keep. Photographs were expensive, and complicated to take and arrange, and therefore most people didn’t have them done frequently. The death of a baby or child therefore often meant that the family had no photograph of the person at all, or no photograph taken with children born later than the one who had died.

But in other cases, it was part of a morbid fascination with death – the kind of behaviour that saw Queen Victoria go into black widow’s clothes for 4 decades, from the time of her husband Prince Albert’s death in 1860 until she died herself in 1901. Thus the photographs showing a young mother’s children draped over her grave or tombstone, for example.

Some of these dead photos featured the person lying down, as if asleep. In others, the person was propped up, and even had his eyes painted in after the photo was taken. In these cases, the only way you can be sure which person is definitely dead is by noting that the face is very clear – the long exposures needed meant that living people tended to blur, slightly.


Star Ferry & Central Pier
image post
Image by Not Quite a Photographr
My first experiments in Tilt Shift Miniature Faking. The picture was not originally taken with this technique in mind, so the depth of field is not ideal. The result is not as miniaturesque as a typical tilt-shift fake, but I still like how it highlights the ferry in the middle.

This is the original image.

Want to learn how to do it? Here is a great tutorial.

 
Support : Copyright © 2015. Photos Gallery - All Rights Reserved